HEALTH

Back Bone/ Back Pain Disease- Causes & Symptoms

Back pain causes

The most common causes of lower back pain are strain and problems with back structures.

Strain
Strained muscles often cause back pain. Strain commonly occurs with incorrect lifting of heavy objects and sudden awkward movements.

Strain can also result from over-activity. An example is the sore feeling and stiffness that occurs after a few hours of yard work or playing a sport.

Structural problems
Vertebrae are the interlocking bones stacked on top of one another that make up the spine. Disks are areas of tissue that cushion the space between each vertebra. Disk injuries are a fairly common cause of back pain.

Sometimes these disks can bulge, herniate, or rupture. Nerves can get compressed when this happens.

Herniated disks can be very painful. A bulging disk pressing on the nerve that travels from your back down your leg can cause sciatica or irritation of the sciatic nerve. Sciatica can be experienced in your leg as:

pain
tingling
numbness
Arthritis
Spinal osteoarthritis is also a potential cause for back pain. It’s caused by damage and deterioration in the cartilage of joints in your lower back.

Over time, this condition can lead to narrowing of the spinal column, or spinal stenosis.

Osteoporosis
Loss of bone density and thinning of the bone, called osteoporosis, can lead to small fractures in your vertebrae. These fractures can cause serious pain and are referred to as compression fractures.

Other causes of back pain
There are many other potential causes of back pain, but most of these are rare. Be sure to see your doctor if you experience regular back pain that does not go away.

After ruling out the more common causes of back pain, your doctor will perform tests to determine if you have a rarer cause. These can include:

displacement of one vertebral body onto another, called degenerative spondylolisthesis
loss of nerve function at the lower spinal cord, called cauda equina syndrome (a medical emergency)
fungal or bacterial infection of the spine, such as Staphylococcus, E. coli, or tuberculosis
cancer or nonmalignant tumor in the spine
kidney infection or kidney stones

Back Pain Causes

The most common causes of lower back pain are strain and problems with back structures.

Strain
Strained muscles often cause back pain. Strain commonly occurs with incorrect lifting of heavy objects and sudden awkward movements.

Strain can also result from over-activity. An example is the sore feeling and stiffness that occurs after a few hours of yard work or playing a sport.

Structural problems
Vertebrae are the interlocking bones stacked on top of one another that make up the spine. Disks are areas of tissue that cushion the space between each vertebra. Disk injuries are a fairly common cause of back pain.

Sometimes these disks can bulge, herniate, or rupture. Nerves can get compressed when this happens.

Herniated disks can be very painful. A bulging disk pressing on the nerve that travels from your back down your leg can cause sciatica or irritation of the sciatic nerve. Sciatica can be experienced in your leg as:

pain
tingling
numbness
Arthritis
Spinal osteoarthritis is also a potential cause for back pain. It’s caused by damage and deterioration in the cartilage of joints in your lower back.

Over time, this condition can lead to narrowing of the spinal column, or spinal stenosis.

Osteoporosis
Loss of bone density and thinning of the bone, called osteoporosis, can lead to small fractures in your vertebrae. These fractures can cause serious pain and are referred to as compression fractures.

Other causes of back pain
There are many other potential causes of back pain, but most of these are rare. Be sure to see your doctor if you experience regular back pain that does not go away.

After ruling out the more common causes of back pain, your doctor will perform tests to determine if you have a rarer cause. These can include:

displacement of one vertebral body onto another, called degenerative spondylolisthesis
loss of nerve function at the lower spinal cord, called cauda equina syndrome (a medical emergency)
fungal or bacterial infection of the spine, such as Staphylococcus, E. coli, or tuberculosis
cancer or nonmalignant tumor in the spine
kidney infection or kidney stones

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